Table of Contents

Why this book? 0       Table of Contents 1        Introduction 2        The discontinuity of digital technologies 3        MPEG and digital media 4        The MPEG principles 5        The MPEG operation 5.1        The MPEG organisation 5.2        Organisation of work 5.3        How MPEG develops standards 5.4        The ecosystem drives MPEG standards 5.5        Standardisation and product making 5.6        Standards are living […]

Continue reading


1 – Introduction

Media is a word typically used to indicate the means that enable communication, e.g. radio, television, storage media, internet. This book, however, calls those media delivery media and uses the word “media” or more precisely, “media content” to indicate the information con­veyed by the del­ivery media. This is not an abstract distinction. It is the core […]

Continue reading


2 – The discontinuity of digital technologies

Introduction This chapter analyses four aspects of the media distribution business and their enabling tech­nologies: Analogue media distribution describes the vertical businesses of analogue media distribution; Digitised media describes media digitisation and why it was largely irrelevant to distribution; Compressed digital media describes how industry tried to use compression for distribution; Digital technologies for media […]

Continue reading


4 – The MPEG principles

Introduction The challenging goals that MPEG set to itself 3 decades ago have been successfully achieved across many gener­ations of digital media standards implemented in countless products, applications and ser­vices by many different indus­tries in interoperable ways. How could this happen? A significant part of the answer lies in the fact that MPEG has developed […]

Continue reading


5 – The MPEG operation

Over the years, MPEG has developed a large number of standards and specifications following the principles described in the Chapter MPEG Principles and implemented them in an efficient way. This operational practice obviously respects the general rules laid down in the ISO/IEC directives. The MPEG organisation describes MPEG’s internal organisation; Organisation of work describes how the expertise […]

Continue reading


5.1 – The MPEG organisation

The MPEG membership MPEG’s most precious assets are its members. As MPEG is an ISO working group, to be entitled to attend and actively participate, experts and/or their companies must be members of one of the 162 national standards organisations who are members of ISO (or as an ap­proved liaison officer from another organisation). Respondents […]

Continue reading


5.2 – Organisation of work

Introduction No one, reading MPEG standards, should deny that the spectrum of MPEG standards is an im­pressive set of disparate technologies integrated to cover  fields connected by the common thread of technologies underpinning Data Compression: Coding of Video, Audio, 3D Graphics, Fonts, Digital Items, Sensors and Actuators Data, Genome, and Neural Networks; Media Description and […]

Continue reading


5.3 – How MPEG develops standards

The discovery of algorithms that enable better and/or new audio-visual user experiences may trigger the development and deployment of highly rewarding solutions. By joining MPEG, companies owning good technologies have the opportunity to make them part of a standard that will help industry develop top performance and interoperable products, services and applications. Figure 9 depicts how […]

Continue reading